How do I use my Interference Rejection (I.R.)?

You will have a hard time getting rid of interference if everyone randomly presses their I.R. button at the same.  Have only one I.R. button being pressed at a time and remember to communicate with each other and be systematic in this process.

1.     First turn all units off. 
2.     Turn two units back on and have one person press their I.R. button until both units are clear.
3.     If there is a third unit turn it on and press the I.R. button until the display is clear between all three units. 
4.     If there is still interference at this point you may have to start the process over again and use a different starting I.R. level.

Once you get four units or more it is almost impossible to get rid of all interference so try to reach a level of interference you can accept.  Keeping your gain as low as possible will greatly help to reduce the amount of interference the receiver is open to.  You can also try using a transducer with a narrower cone angle.

Lots of interference

It is important to understand the difference between true interference and “clutter”.  True interference looks like fish targets that go round and round the dial.  This is caused by electrical interference, or “noise”, from other electronics.  Use your I.R. (Interference Rejection) button to help clear up this interference.  Note the higher you have your gain the more susceptible you are to interference. Make sure that your transducer is below the bottom of the ice so you don’t get noise from within the hole.

If you have random green blips appearing randomly all over your screen you are seeing “clutter”.  In almost all cases “clutter” is something being picked up in the water and not false readings or your Vexilar malfunctioning.  To reduce “clutter” keep your gain as low as possible or try using the “Low Power” mode.  If your unit doesn’t have a “Low Power” mode you might want to try a suppression cable.  If you spend a lot of time in shallow water and struggle with “clutter”, changing to a wider cone angled transducer can help.  If you have an FLX-28 use C.S. (Color Select) #2.  This gets rid of the green light allowing you only to see the stronger signals.

Lots of green lines all over

If you have random green blips appearing randomly all over your screen you are seeing “clutter”.  In almost all cases “clutter” is something being picked up in the water and not false readings or your Vexilar malfunctioning.  To reduce “clutter” keep your gain as low as possible or try using the “Low Power” mode.  If your unit doesn’t have a “Low Power” mode you might want to try a suppression cable.  If you spend a lot of time in shallow water and struggle with “clutter”, changing to a wider cone angled transducer can help.  If you have an FLX-28 use C.S. (Color Select) #2.  This gets rid of the green light allowing you only to see the stronger signals.

Solid green lines at the top of the screen

This is typically caused by a transducer that isn’t below the bottom of the ice.  Your transducer will create noise that will ring inside the hole and cause this “clutter”.  Drop the transducer just below the bottom of the ice to clear this up.

Line a few feet down that never goes away

This is common when the ice gets so thick you actually get a signal that bounces off the top of the water and back down to the transducer.  If you move your transducer up and down you will probably see the signal move with it.  You can try raising the transducer until this line goes away but keep in mind it’s always best to keep the transducer below the bottom of the ice to reduce “ice noise”.

Signal is too strong

This can be due to a couple things. Mostly the transducer and depth affects signal strength. The narrower cone angle the transducer has the stronger it will be and the shallower water you are in the stronger the signal will be. Make sure to keep your gain as low as possible. If you are at zero gain and the signal is still too strong, try going into “Low Power” mode or use a suppression cable. The other thing you can try is use a wider cone angled transducer.

Colors flashing "wildly" around the dial

If you have used your I.R. (Interference Rejection) button and get no change this is probably not interference.  More likely this symptom indicates a low battery that needs to be charged or replaced.  If you don’t have a voltage meter handy, a quick and easy test to verify this is to plug your charger into the wall and connect the Vexilar at the same time (you will not hurt anything by doing so).  If your Vexilar comes back to life when the charger is connected this confirms your battery needs to be charged or replaced.   

To properly check your battery with a voltage meter:

1.     Fully charge the battery
2.     Disconnect the charger
3.     Put a load on the battery by running the Vexilar for at least 10 minutes
4.     Connect your voltage meter to the battery

No battery is the same so it’s hard to put an exact number on what determines a good verses a bad battery.  A voltage reading around 12.5V (give or take a few tenths of a volt) would be considered a good battery.  A battery reading lower than this does not mean it’s unusable, it just may not last as many hours as battery at 100% capacity.