Cable is damaged

Damaged Ice-ducer cables can be repaired if the damaged portion is further than 4 inches away from the transducer.  Any closer doesn’t leave enough wire to work with to repair properly.  If you want your cable repaired send it in the Vexilar.  Ice-ducer repairs typically cost $15.00 labor plus $10.00 shipping.Service Truck

Nothing shows but a light at the top

Nothing shows but a light at the top

In most cases this is an issue with the transducer.  There’s either a break in the connection somewhere or the transducer has completely lost sensitivity. 

To test for a break in the connection turn your unit on and hold the bottom of the transducer to your ear.  You should hear the transducer clicking.  If it is not clicking there is most likely a break in the transducer cable somewhere.  The most common breaking points are right at the transducer itself or by the connector.  While holding the transducer to your ear try wiggling the cable at these points to see if you can get the transducer to start clicking again.  If you find a break in your wire further than 4 inches away from the transducer you can send it for repair ($15.00 labor + $10.00 shipping).  If the break is right at the transducer there is unfortunately no repair it will need to be replaced.

If the transducer always clicks yet you still only get a light at the top the transducer has probably lost its sensitivity.  Unfortunately there is no fix for this and is best to replace the transducer.

The best way to verify it is indeed the transducer is by getting a second known good Vexilar transducer.  Plug this transducer into your unit.  If everything works without problems it further confirms you have a transducer issue.  If the second known good transducer still has the same issue it’s likely there is an issue in the head unit itself.  At this point it’s best to send the head unit in for repair.  This kind of failure is rare and it’s hard to say exactly what it is.  Cost could vary from $30.00 to $115.00 in most cases.Service Truck

Cannot see jig unless I turn the gain way up

Most of the time this is due to a weak transducer.  The best way to confirm this is to get a second known good Vexilar transducer and hook it up to your unit.  If this fixes your issue its best to buy a new transducer.  Unfortunately there is no fix for weak transducers.

If you put a second known good transducer and still have sensitivity issues you may have an issue in the head unit itself.  If this is the case send the unit in for evaluation.  Typical repairs can range from $30.00 to $115.00.

Remember the environment you’re in and the equipment you are using can play a big role in what you are seeing.  If the jig isn’t within the cone angle or if it’s on the outer edges you may have a hard time seeing it.  Current, a minnow swimming off to the side, very shallow water where the viewing area is very limited or a transducer that isn’t hanging vertically can also cause this.Service Truck

Lots of interference

It is important to understand the difference between true interference and “clutter”.  True interference looks like fish targets that go round and round the dial.  This is caused by electrical interference, or “noise”, from other electronics.  Use your I.R. (Interference Rejection) button to help clear up this interference.  Note the higher you have your gain the more susceptible you are to interference. Make sure that your transducer is below the bottom of the ice so you don’t get noise from within the hole.

If you have random green blips appearing randomly all over your screen you are seeing “clutter”.  In almost all cases “clutter” is something being picked up in the water and not false readings or your Vexilar malfunctioning.  To reduce “clutter” keep your gain as low as possible or try using the “Low Power” mode.  If your unit doesn’t have a “Low Power” mode you might want to try a suppression cable.  If you spend a lot of time in shallow water and struggle with “clutter”, changing to a wider cone angled transducer can help.  If you have an FLX-28 use C.S. (Color Select) #2.  This gets rid of the green light allowing you only to see the stronger signals.

Lots of green lines all over

If you have random green blips appearing randomly all over your screen you are seeing “clutter”.  In almost all cases “clutter” is something being picked up in the water and not false readings or your Vexilar malfunctioning.  To reduce “clutter” keep your gain as low as possible or try using the “Low Power” mode.  If your unit doesn’t have a “Low Power” mode you might want to try a suppression cable.  If you spend a lot of time in shallow water and struggle with “clutter”, changing to a wider cone angled transducer can help.  If you have an FLX-28 use C.S. (Color Select) #2.  This gets rid of the green light allowing you only to see the stronger signals.

Solid green lines at the top of the screen

This is typically caused by a transducer that isn’t below the bottom of the ice. Your transducer will create noise that will ring inside the hole and cause this “clutter”. Drop the transducer just below the bottom of the ice to clear this up

What transducer do I have?

On our newer 19º and 12º Iceducers this will be stamped in the top of the transducer.  If it has a blue bottom it is a Proview Iceducer.  If your transducer has a red bottom it is a Tri-Beam Iceducer.

If you have an older transducer it becomes harder to tell unless you are familiar with the difference in size.  Typically FL-8’s came standard with a 19º Iceducer.

What transducer should I use?

There is no black and white answer to this so it’s hard to give a definite answer. A lot of it is personal preference. In general the shallower water you fish, the wider cone angle is preferred. The deeper water you fish, the narrower cone angle is preferred. The 19º and 12º Iceducers are good down to about 60 feet. If you fish over that you’d want to get a Proview Iceducer. However, a lot of people like using the Proview Iceducer in shallow water as well to more easily see between structure on the bottom. If you are one who fishes all different types of depths you might like the Tri-Beam Iceducer which has 8º/12º/20º cone angles in one..